Plato"s Laws force and truth in politics by Gregory Recco

Cover of: Plato

Published by Indiana University Press in Bloomington, Ind .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Philosophy,
  • Political science

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Book details

Statementedited by Gregory Recco and Eric Sanday
SeriesStudies in continental thought
Classifications
LC ClassificationsJC71.P264 P54 2012
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25346916M
ISBN 109780253001788, 9780253001825, 9780253001887
LC Control Number2012019903

Download Plato"s Laws

The Laws is Plato’s last, longest, and, perhaps, most loathed work. The book is a conversation on political philosophy between three elderly men: an unnamed Athenian, a Spartan named Megillus, and a Cretan named Clinias. These men work to create a constitution for Platos Laws book, a new Cretan colony.

Plato's The Laws is a classic masterpiece. Although it would be cumbersome to give a description of every section of the book, here are some highlights: Plato starts off talking about the inadequacy of Spartan and Cretan legislation, in /5(90). The Laws of Plato is not entirely laws.

It is not entirely anything, really. It seems to be a nice collection of aphoristic sayings, wise and pithy truths, and overall a collection of legal requirements for a city whose regulation is the main focus of this work/5.

The posthumous publication of The Argument and the Action of Plato's "Laws" was compiled shortly before Platos Laws book death of Leo Strauss in Strauss offers an insightful and instructive reading through careful probing of Plato's classic text. "Strauss's The Argument and the Action of Plato's 'Laws' reflects his interest in political thought, his dogged method of following the argument of the Laws Cited by: In all these cases there should be one law, which will make men in general less liable to transgress in word or deed, and less foolish, because they will not be allowed to practise religious rites contrary to Platos Laws book.

And let this be the simple form of the law: No man shall have sacred rites in a private house. But the general division of laws according to their importance into a first and second and third class, we who are lovers of law may make ourselves.

Meg. Very; good. Ath. We maintain, then, that a State which would be safe and happy, as far as the nature of man allows, must and ought to distribute honour and dishonour in the right way.

The Laws of Plato contain numerous passages which closely resemble other passages in his writings. And at first sight a suspicion arises that the repetition shows the unequal hand of the imitator.

For why should a writer say over again, in a more imperfect form, what he had already said in his most finished style and manner.

More than in any other writing of Plato the tone is hortatory; the laws are sermons as well as laws; they are considered to have a religious sanction, and to rest upon a religious sentiment in the mind of the citizens.

Plato’s Laws Outline of Book I I. Introductory conversation (ac) The divine origin of legislation, and the human project of inquiring into laws. • (aa) Zeus and Apollo credited with the origin Platos Laws book Cretan and Spartan laws. • (a-c) A discussion of “constitutions and laws” proposed to fill the.

LAWS BOOK I. PERSONS OF THE DIALOGUE: An Athenian Stranger, Cleinias (a Cretan), Megillus (a Lacedaemonian). ATHENIAN: Tell me, Strangers, is a God or some man supposed to be the author of your laws. CLEINIAS: A God, Stranger; in very truth a God: among us Cretans he is said to have been Zeus, but in Lacedaemon, whence our friend here comes,File Size: 1MB.

The Laws was Plato's last work, his longest, and one of his most difficult. In contrast to the Republic, which presents an abstract ideal not intended for any actual community, the Laws seems to provide practical guidelines for the establishment and maintenance of political order in the real world.

With this book, the distinguished classicist Seth Benardete offers an/5. Books; Plato's 'Laws' Plato's 'Laws' Plato's 'Laws' A Critical Guide. Get access. Buy the Platos Laws book book Check if you have access via personal or institutional login.

Log in Register Recommend to librarian Cited by 3; Cited by. Crossref Citations. This book. Readers of Plato have often neglected the Laws because of its length and density. In this set of interpretive essays, notable scholars of the Laws from the fields of classics, history, philosophy, and political science offer a collective close reading of the dialogue "book by book" and reflect on the work as a whole.

If any case of this kind is ever brought to the notice of the selected judges, either on the information of the doer of the act or on that of him who is pleading for the doer, and if it be judged that he was in this state of madness when he broke the law, [e] then he shall certainly pay for the damage he has done, but only the exact sum, and he shall be acquitted of the other.

Unfinished also is Plato's last work of the twelve books of Laws (Socrates is absent from it), a critical discussion of principles of law which Plato thought the Greeks might accept.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of Plato is in twelve volumes. Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. Project Gutenberg 60, free ebooks; 66 by Plato; Laws by Plato.

No cover available. Download; Bibrec; Bibliographic Record. Author: Plato. BCE. BCE: Translator: Jowett, Benjamin, Title: audio books by Jane Austen. The Republic (Greek: Πολιτεία, translit. Politeia; Latin: Res Publica) is a Socratic dialogue, authored by Plato around BC, concerning justice (δικαιοσύνη), the order and character of the just city-state, and the just man.

It is Plato's best-known work, and has proven to be one of the world's most influential works of philosophy and political theory, both intellectually Author: Plato. the Athenian in Book 1 says that a healthy city will institute a law of laws, forbidding questioning the laws with the sole exception that citizens over the age of fifty who have an improvement to propose may do so privately to the magistrates.

Plato's Laws is one of the most important surviving works of ancient Greek political thought. It offers sustained reflection on the enterprise of legislation, and on its role in the social and religious regulation of society in all its aspects.

Many of its ideas were drawn upon by later political. Plato's Laws is one of the most important surviving works of ancient Greek political thought. It offers sustained reflection on the enterprise of legislation, and on its role in the social and religious regulation of society in all its aspects.

Many of its ideas were drawn upon by later political thinkers, from Aristotle and Cicero to Thomas More and Montesquieu. This book presents the. In the passage Plato states the need for a special law against impiety. (The law itself is formulated and discussed only briefly at the end of Book 10; most of the intervening space is occupied with a formal rhetorical "prelude" to the law addressing the root causes of impious actions -- namely, incorrect beliefs about the gods.).

The Laws, Plato's longest dialogue, has for centuries been recognized as the most comprehensive exposition of the practical consequences of his philosophy, a necessary corrective to the more visionary and utopian Republic.

In this animated encounter between a foreign philosopher and a powerful statesman, not only do we see reflected, in Plato's own thought, 5/5(1). In his Book 12 discussion, Plato describes the members of the Nocturnal Council as “those who will really be guardians of the laws” (Laws B5).

The members of the Nocturnal Council will, if properly educated, be “made into guardians whose like, with respect to the virtue of safekeeping, we have not seen come into being in our lives previously” (Laws C2–3).Cited by: 3. Buy a cheap copy of The Laws book by Plato.

The Laws, Plato's longest dialogue, has for centuries been recognized as the most comprehensive exposition of the practical consequences of his philosophy, a Free shipping over $Cited by: The Laws is Plato's last and longest dialogue.

Although it has been neglected (compared to such works as the Republic and Symposium), it is beginning to receive a great deal of scholarly attention.

Book 10 of the Laws contains Plato's fullest defence of the existence of the gods, and his last word on their nature, as well as a presentation and defence of laws against impiety. Minos b-d. above, note 6, and Laws b. For more detail about the following account see my “‘Reason Striving to Become Law’: Nature and Law in Plato’s Laws,” American Journal of Jurisprudence 54 (): Laws a.

Laws a. Laws d. Laws c-d. Laws eb. Laws b; cf. Written in the hope that it may shed some light on what is a poorly recognised yet important piece of Ancient Greek philosophical work. This article is a summary into the Athenian interlocutor's argument into the relevance and existence of the.

Plato: Plato against the atheists, or, The tenth book of the dialogue on laws, accompanied with critical notes, and followed by extended dissertations on some of the main points of the platonic philosophy and theology, especially as compared with the Holy Scriptures / (New York: Harper, ) (page images at HathiTrust).

In the Laws, Plato applies the idea of a fixed, natural law to sex, and takes a much harsher line than he does in the Symposium or the Phraedrus.

In Book One he writes about how opposite-sex sex acts cause pleasure by nature, while same-sex sexuality is “unnatural” (c). The Philosopher’s Character (–a) Summary Philosophers who have true vision are best suited to guard the laws and customs of a city.

Other people are blind compared to them. Philosophers love truth, spurn physical pleasures, and don’t fear death. They are temperate, courageous, and just. Book Summary The major intent of the debate in the Republic is to determine an extended definition of what constitutes Justice in a given state, whether or not a concept of Justice may be determined by citizens in a given state at the time that Plato is writing, and how Justice may be accomplished in a given state (how laws might be enacted that would serve the citizens of a.

LAWS Plato translated by Benjamin Jowett Plato (~~ BC) - One of the greatest and most influential Greek philosophers, he was a disciple of Socrates and the teacher of Aristotle.

Most of his works are written dialogues, many with Socrates as the main character. Plato founded a school of philosophy known as the Academy.

Laws ( BC) - PlatoFile Size: KB. The Harvard Classics, Volume 2: The Apology, Phaedo and Crito of Plato, the Golden sayings of Epictetus, the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius. The Great Books Reading and Discussion Program (First Series, Volume 1): Rothschild's Fiddle, On Happiness, The Apology, Heart of Darkness, Conscience, Genesis, Alienated Labour, Social Contract.

the tenth book of the Laws, by invoking the analogy of a circular motion, which combines change with the retention of a fixed centre, he explained how deity could exemplify both absoluteness and change.

Plato thus may be viewed as a quasi-panentheist. “This book compares the ancient law collections of the Ancient Near East, the Greeks and the Pentateuch to determine the legal antecedents for the biblical laws. A striking number of legal parallels are found to be with Athenian laws, and specifically with those found in Plato’s Laws.

Long understudied, Plato's Laws has been the object of renewed attention in the past decade and is now considered to be his major work of political philosophy besides the Republic. In his last dialogue, Plato returns to the project of describing the foundation of a just city and sketches in considerable detail its constitution, laws and other social institutions.

Unfinished also is Plato’s last work of the twelve books of Laws (Socrates is absent from it), a critical discussion of principles of law which Plato thought the Greeks might accept.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of Plato is in twelve volumes. The basis of moral responsibility is the central issue of Book IX of Laws, where Plato develops his theory of punishment, conciliating the Socratic thesis that no one is voluntarily bad (οὐδεὶς ἑκὼν κακός), with the practical necessity for a.

This book presents the first translation of the complete text of the Laws for thirty-five years, in Tom Griffith's readable and reliable English. Malcolm Schofield, a leading scholar of Greek philosophy, introduces the main themes and characteristics of the work, as well as supplying authoritative notes on the structure and detail of Plato's.

The best books on Plato recommended by Melissa Lane. Greek and Roman Political Ideas: A Pelican Introduction though interestingly it’s often neglected, he brings his critique to bear on written laws. People often just treat this Plato book as a critique of writing. He says that the problem with writing is that writing runs away with.

Read BOOK I. of Laws by Plato. The text begins: PERSONS OF THE DIALOGUE: An Athenian Stranger, Cleinias (a Cretan), Megillus (a Lacedaemonian). ATHENIAN: Tell me, Strangers, is a God or some man supposed to be the author of your laws? CLEINIAS: A God, Stranger; in very truth a God: among us Cretans he is said to have been Zeus, but in Lacedaemon, whence our .The Laws, Plato’s longest dialogue, has for centuries been recognized as the most comprehensive exposition of the practical consequences of his philosophy, a necessary corrective to the more visionary and utopian this animated encounter between a foreign philosopher and a powerful statesman, not only do we see reflected, in Plato’s own thought.

Plato's pronouncements on the arts in Book X have engaged a spirited scholarly debate that continues to the present day. Many societies have from time to time adopted Plato's ideas in order to advocate and practice censorship of the arts on the grounds that they manifest themes that are morally corruptive, that they "send the wrong message" to.

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